Semi-permanent eyebrow (brow tattoo): what to pay attention to!

Hi, gorgeous ladies!

I’d like to dedicate this article to one of the vital issues: semi-permanent eyebrows tattoo. I’m writing only about the things I’ve practiced on myself, that is why this is my real experience: I’d love that someone could learn something from it.

Everybody knows that eyebrows are very important for one’s face expressivity. Let’s see how the shape of eyebrows changed in history from ancient civilizations until today.

Eyebrows in Ancient Egypt

As depicted on the bust of Queen Nefertiti, Ancient Egyptian women sported arched brows darkened with powders made from minerals. Greek historian Herodotus documented that when a cat died in a home, everyone who lived there would shave their eyebrows in mourning. When a dog died, everyone in the house would shave their whole body as well as their head.

Eyebrows in Ancient Greece and Rome

 The ancient Greek people valued purity, so women often left their brows untouched or darkened slightly with black powder. In both cultures, unibrows were prized as beautiful, desirable features worn by the most intelligent and lusted-after women. If one didn’t have a unibrow, they would create one with black paint.

Eyebrows The Middle Ages

The forehead was the most important feature of the medieval period, which is why women often removed their eyelashes and eyebrows. Later in the 15th century, Queen Elizabeth’s reddish blonde (these days we’d call it strawberry blonde) inspired many women in her country to dye their hair and brows in similar reddish shades.

Eyebrows in Victorian Era

Women who wore obvious makeup were frowned upon in this era and thought of as prostitutes, which is why ladies of breeding left their brows quite bushy and untamed.
 

Eyebrows in 1920-1930

As seen on silent movie starlets like Clara Bow, women wore their eyebrows extremely thin and straight by way of extensive plucking, lending to a dramatic, pensive look. They also used petroleum jelly or Vaseline to groom and add shine and emphasis to slender brows. The ’20s were the first era in which regular women began to cull inspiration from celebrities and entertainers, which has continued into today.
 

1930-1940

Women continued to wear dark, shiny and severely tweezed brows, but rather than sport straight lines, they favored dramatic high, rounded arches, which sometimes extended all the way to the temple. Jean Harlow‘s thin, curved brow defined the era.
 

1940-1950

A softer, more natural look came into popularity in the ’40s, with movie stars like Lauren Bacall bringing heavier, prominently arched brows into vogue as regular women followed suit. The Old Hollywood red carpet looks we see today are heavily inspired by the thick, well-groomed brows and cherry red lips of this era.

1950-1960

Think Audrey Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe, and Elizabeth Taylor—the celebrities of this time sported thick, dark brows that were often penciled in to achieve a bolder, more enhanced look. They retained similar arched shapes to the brows of the ’40s, but the effect was stronger and more pronounced as the defining feature of the face.

1960-1970

Sophia Loren had the most storied brows of the decade, and for good reason: she shaved them off entirely, then would painstakingly pencil them back in using super-short, precise strokes. Audrey Hepburn‘s straight, natural brows remained popular, while art scene “It” girl Edie Sedgwick blackened hers to contrast her platinum hair for a serious statement look.

1970-1980

A handful of brow looks were favored during this time, including thicker, more natural brows as worn by the hippies of the decade and the thinner, more pronounced arches worn by disco enthusiasts. Actresses like Lauren Hutton popularized natural, “fresh-faced” beauty looks, and eyebrow trends followed suit, with many women setting aside their tweezers.


1980-1990

Bushy brows were the ticket to ’80s glamour, with Brooke Shields as the cover girl du jour. Thick, ungroomed “caterpillar” brows were all the rage, and a heavy, almost disheveled look was desirable and emulated with the help of brow pencils and powders.

1990-2000

Anyone who came of age in the ’90s will remember it well: super-thin, over-tweezed brows ran rampant this decade, with stars like Drew Barrymore and Pamela Anderson rocking teeny-tiny arches that often resulted in a perpetually shocked-looking expression. The ’90s were not a good decade for eyebrows.

2000-present

The early aughties held onto the past decade’s thin brows, but we’ve since gone the opposite way of over-plucking, instead favoring thick, lush looks and natural arches.
Cara Delevingne‘s beloved brows dominate the catwalk, with everyone from celebrities to regular people using pencils, waxes, powders, gels, and more to emulate the bold, dark, statement brow effect.

My experience with semi-permanent eyebrows tattoo

So, during ’90s, which were not a good decade for eyebrows, as everybody I over-plucked my eyebrows. I think constant hair removal weakens the hair bulbs and I’ve seen it happens often with blond-haired people. So my eyebrows were very thin and didn’t grow.

When I started my career of  make up artist, once our teacher in make up academy told me that my thin eyebrows didn’t suit my face shape at all. Before she told me that, I’d never thought about it before. In fact my face shape is square and my eyebrows were very think and angled. So, from that moment on, I started to make my eyebrows soften in shape and larger. Surely, I like it better.

There were not so many eyebrows products at that time, especially waterproof,  so in summer or in the gym it was a disaster. Then I found out waterproof products for eyebrows of make up forever Acqua Brow and then Mac, and lately a waterproof eyeliner by Kat Von D, so I became a real specialist in eyebrow shape and I can do it with my eyes closed, but this everyday routine was a bit tiring.

Finally, all those semi-permanent technique of make up appeared and were getting more and more popular, so I started to have an idea to do my eyebrows.

So, I started to see different professionals, their portfolios, photos before and after, I’ve been thinking over for a lot of time, and I decided. The person where I did my first eyebrow tattoo previously was a make up artist, so I thought its more secure as she understands the shape well.

Here I would like to emphasize: the trick here is that almost no one shows you the sequence of photos of the same person before, after the tattoo treatment, after 2 weeks and after 1 month when they get healed. You see only before and after. That was my mistake. I got attracted by the photos after the treatment, so I didn’t like my final result. I couldn’t come after one month to do the correction of colour, so let’s say I decided to do it again with the same person.

I explained what I wanted, showed all my photos how I do my eyebrows, so we did it again. Let’s say it’s not a very pleasant feeling when they do a tattoo on your face. Anyway, after one month I went again to do a correction, and again I didn’t like the final result: the thin shape, the colour that almost faded away after one month. So I continue to draw my eyebrows at least: I’m satisfied with my shape and it suits my face shape. Surely when I ever decide to do it again, I will do a thorough study of a professional and I will ask for the photos of the clients after one month from the treatment!

Learn how to get the perfect eyebrow shape

Very few of us are born with completely symmetrical faces, which is why the size, shape and position of our features can vary ever so slightly. And when it comes to our eyebrows, one may grow perfectly, arching at just the right point, whereas the other may be sparser and just not play ball regardless of how much tweezing and makeup we apply. So that’s why we go to professionals who can tell us how to get perfect the eyebrow shape.

So how to get perfect eyebrow shape? There are various techniques and the professional you choose must inform what is best for you.
 

how to shape eyebrows: tips & Techniques
 

Powdery filled technique:  
The “powdery filled” technique involves a filling in or thickening of areas that already have eyebrow hair present with a soft or darker color which varies in transparency. As opposed to creating hairline strokes from scratch to cover bald or thin areas, the powdery filled technique is best for those simply wanting shaping or just an enhancement.

Soft hair stroke technique:
The soft hair stroke method is ideal for those who have very little to no eyebrow hair to begin with. Very fine hairline strokes are created to visually replicate individual natural hairs as opposed to a “block” of solid ink.

Feathering technique:
This is basically a combination of the shading and hair stroke techniques, whereby strokes are made closer to one another other creating a shaded dimensional appearance.

Ombre technique
The Ombre brow comes from using two different brow colors, one lighter than the other. It is more natural looking than solid colour and is the latest craze in eyebrow semi-permanent make up.

The term ‘Ombre’ is from the French word meaning “shaded” or “shading”. Ombre hair colour is generally darker at the roots through the mid-shaft and then gradually gets lighter from the mid-shaft to the ends. For eyebrows the reverse is true: the colour is lightest at the thinnest part of the eyebrow and gets darker to the end.


These techniques require particular skill and precision from your brow expert to make your eyebrows look natural, so make sure to do your research on your brow experts ability before committing, no matter what cost it’s provided to you at, as we have seen some bad brows over the years, some that we couldn’t even help correct.

 

How do you know what shape semi-permanent eyebrow makeup will suit your face?

During your consultation with the chosen professional, you’ll discuss the look you want to achieve and she’ll design permanent makeup eyebrows to suit your face in a colour that complements your skin tone.

But to give you a heads up on what shape semi-permanent eyebrow make up will suit your face the best, we’ve put together a simple step by step guide.

 

Step 1: identify your face shape

In order to determine the best shape eyebrow to suit your face, you need to take the shape of your face into consideration. Face shapes are generally oval, long, round, square, heart or diamond shaped.

Depending on your face shape, eyebrows can do many things from shorten and elongate the face, to balance and soften angular features and even add drama. 
 

Step 2: determine which eyebrow shape suits your face shape

Choosing the right eyebrow shape can enhance your face shape by accentuating your eyes, opening up the eye area to give a more youthful appearance and even add definition to your cheekbones.

Oval face
If you have an oval face, opt for a soft angled eyebrow that starts at the bridge of the nose and goes up into a gentle curve, before dropping down to extend slightly beyond the outer corner of the eye.

Long face
Choose more of a flat, horizontal eyebrow with an extended brow tail if you have a long face as it will help to shorten the face and balance your features.

Round face
Round faces suit eyebrows with a pronounced vertical arch to add length to the face and to stop it looking so round. A soft angled eyebrow also works well with this face shape too.

Square face
Natural eyebrows with soft arch work well with square faces. Opt for curved eyebrows to soften the jawline.

Heart face
Eyebrows with either a pronounced arch or a rounded, low arch will accentuate heart shaped faces and balance out a delicate jawline.

Diamond face
diamond faces suit both round and curved shaped eyebrows as they help to soften the angular shape of the face.

How to find a good permanent makeup artist - according to the British Association Of Beauty Therapy & Cosmetology (BABTAC).

• Take a look at your therapist's portfolio to gauge their experience (pay attention to the photos before, after the treatment and after one month when they are healed). Choose therapists with a lot years’ of experience. They are more skilled in face shapes, eyebrow shapes, how the skin reacts and allergy reactions.

• Social media makes it easier than ever to read client reviews, so do your research

• Check out your therapist's training, which should be accredited by either an awarding organization or an official association such as BABTAC.

• Make sure your therapist has specialist treatment-risk insurance to cover you both.

• Before booking, ask the therapist to show you around the clinic so you can check it's clean and hygienic.

• A good therapist will be able to prove that the machine being used in the treatment has a CE mark, and the pigment follows the EU safety regulations.

• Some councils require therapists to have a special treatment license. If yours does, ask to see a copy.

• Be wary if the price seems unusually cheap. This is an invasive treatment and it should cost a reasonable sum.

Hope to have been helpful to those who have the same problem. Think a lot before choosing treatments that regards our face, it’s our responsibility to choose the right people to ensure best results and be healthy and beautiful! 

Source: Stylecaster